Tips for Your Grand Canyon Adventure

Taking on the Grand Canyon can be a little daunting. It is, after all, a mile-deep canyon. You may be debating over what side of the canyon to tour, or how to best tour the canyon. It’s a tough decision. We’ve come up with a few tips to cut out some of the complexities in your decision and, ultimately, make your visit to this beautiful natural and national landmark all the better.

The Grand Canyon is a secluded, lightly populated area.

  • This means that you have to remember a few things to stay safe and ensure your visit is a good one. If you are driving there on your own, remember that locksmiths may be few and far away. Bring extra car keys, and keep them in a safe place. If you have car problems, your vehicle will most likely be towed to Flagstaff or Williams. A mechanic is located on the South Rim, but can only do minor repairs. Gas stations may be far away, so make sure you always have plenty of gas.
  • If you’re on a photo tour, or just want to bring home some picture memories, you should know that the closest camera repair is in Phoenix. There is film available at the South Rim, though.
  • Also, make sure you bring plenty of water, especially in the summer months. Leave some extra water in the car, but keep enough with you to stay hydrated.

Weather is sometimes unexpected, sometimes beneficial and sometimes hazardous.

  • The months of July through September bring thunderstorms to the Grand Canyon area. Although the water is greatly needed and the lightning may paint a beautiful picture in the sky, the storms can also be dangerous. Lightning has been known to injure and prove fatal to park visitors. Therefore, you will need to keep a few things in mind. Always check the weather ahead of time and avoid visiting on days with a high percentage of storms. Never wait until the last minute to avoid a storm. Always keep away from the canyon rim, any rocky outcrops or open areas when a storm hits. Try and get to a shelter, such as a car, shuttle bus or building. If there is no shelter available, stick to small groups of trees or dry and low ground.

Most people visit the South Rim of the Canyon.

  • The South Rim is open 365 days a year, 25 hours every day. The camping, lodging and restaurant services are all open year round. It is easier to get to the South Rim, so there are high traffic areas and some parking problems. Remember, the summer season is the busiest, so reservations are always highly recommended. Though winter weather should definitely be considered, tourists are less likely to visit during November through February, if you’re looking for a more private experience. The South Rim is about 7,000 feet above sea level.
  • Tours available for the South Rim, departing from the Las Vegas area:

South Rim Motorcoach Tour
Grand Canyon South Rim VIP Photo Tour

You can explore the canyon by air, ground or water.

  • There are a variety of tours that will allow you to travel throughout the Grand Canyon in many different ways. Hike, drive, fly over or float down the canyon river for the best sightseeing experiences. You can even combine any of the three into one, incredible tour. Below, there is a list of tours you can choose from. Some will allow you to pick and choose which ways you see the canyon.
  • Tours available by air, departing from the Las Vegas area:

Grand Canyon National Park Airplane/Ground Tour
Grand Canyon West Rim Airplane Tour
EcoStar Grand Celebration Grand Canyon Helicopter Tour
Grand Canyon Helicopter Explorer

  • Tours available by water, departing from the Las Vegas area:

Colorado River Rafting & Hoover Dam Photo Tour

  • Tours available by ground, departing from the Las Vegas area:

Grand Canyon West Rim Motorcoach Tour

These are just a few tips for when you’re planning your Grand Canyon adventure. It’s a dangerous, exciting and unforgettable experience, every time you step foot into the landmark. Don’t miss out on a single memory by choosing the wrong option or by putting yourself into a hazardous situation.

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